cretin-family:

The Ramones in 1976 by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty images

cretin-family:

The Ramones in 1976 by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty images

This should have come out a night ago and the first merlady is a little obscured by tape, but Delphine, I give you…..Mermaids of the Hurricane

amalgameheteroclite:

Victor Moscoso - The Miller Blues Band, 1967.

amalgameheteroclite:

Victor Moscoso - The Miller Blues Band, 1967.

(via wildchildofdecember, sage-and-spirit)

Queens, NY (1969)

Queens, NY (1969)

pete-quaife:

The Village Green Preservation Society (Live, 1973)

woman-unkind:

Toronto Pop Festival. 1969.

woman-unkind:

Toronto Pop Festival. 1969.

Played 32 times

neblowe085:

Fuck the mothers kill the others


Frida Kahlo, Mexican, born July 6,1907What I Saw in the Water, 1938Oil on canvas, 91×70.5 cm
This painting is sometimes referred to as “What the Water Gave Me”. Frida rarely talked about her paintings but in a conversation with Julien Levy she described this painting as: “It is an image of passing time about time and childhood games in the bathtub and the sadness of what had happened to her in the course of her life”. Unlike most of Frida’s paintings, this one has no dominant central focus. It is a symbolic work illustrating various events from the artist’s life and incorporates numerous elements from her other works as well as some that appeared in her later works. The style of this painting is “surrealistic” although Frida never considered herself a “Surrealist” and didn’t even know about surrealism at the time it was painted. What the water gave her were images of past and present, life and death, comfort and lost. In the midst of this vision is Frida, drowned in her imaginings and bleeding from the corner of her mouth. She is kept afloat by a lasso that serves as a tightrope for insects and a miniature dancer. 
Although the painting is signed and dated “1939”, it was actually painted the year before. The unsigned and undated painting was exhibited in Paris by Andre Breton in January of 1939. When it was returned to Mexico Kahlo signed it and dated it “1939”. Frida gave the painting to her photographer lover Nickolas Muray in payment for a $400 debt she owed him.
Frida Kahlo, Mexican, born July 6,1907
What I Saw in the Water, 1938
Oil on canvas, 91×70.5 cm

This painting is sometimes referred to as “What the Water Gave Me”. Frida rarely talked about her paintings but in a conversation with Julien Levy she described this painting as: “It is an image of passing time about time and childhood games in the bathtub and the sadness of what had happened to her in the course of her life”. Unlike most of Frida’s paintings, this one has no dominant central focus. It is a symbolic work illustrating various events from the artist’s life and incorporates numerous elements from her other works as well as some that appeared in her later works. The style of this painting is “surrealistic” although Frida never considered herself a “Surrealist” and didn’t even know about surrealism at the time it was painted. What the water gave her were images of past and present, life and death, comfort and lost. In the midst of this vision is Frida, drowned in her imaginings and bleeding from the corner of her mouth. She is kept afloat by a lasso that serves as a tightrope for insects and a miniature dancer. 

Although the painting is signed and dated “1939”, it was actually painted the year before. The unsigned and undated painting was exhibited in Paris by Andre Breton in January of 1939. When it was returned to Mexico Kahlo signed it and dated it “1939”. Frida gave the painting to her photographer lover Nickolas Muray in payment for a $400 debt she owed him.

(Source: 6792)


Edna St. Vincent Millay was the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for poetry. She was openly bisexual and had affairs with other women and married men. When she finally married, hers was an open marriage. Her 1920 poetry collection A Few Figs From Thistles drew controversy for its novel exploration of female sexuality. She was one of the earliest and strongest voices for what became known as feminism. One of the recurring themes of her poetry was that men might use her body, but not possess her or have any claim over her. (x)

Edna St. Vincent Millay was the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for poetry. She was openly bisexual and had affairs with other women and married men. When she finally married, hers was an open marriage. Her 1920 poetry collection A Few Figs From Thistles drew controversy for its novel exploration of female sexuality. She was one of the earliest and strongest voices for what became known as feminism. One of the recurring themes of her poetry was that men might use her body, but not possess her or have any claim over her. (x)

(Source: siennajune)

paiizogony:

I am so proud of my artistic selfies. My selfie game has been so strong the past few days. It’s making me feel so much better because I’ve been at such a low point. I’m so fucking petty it’s disgusting and I hate myself to be honest.

paiizogony:

I am so proud of my artistic selfies. My selfie game has been so strong the past few days. It’s making me feel so much better because I’ve been at such a low point. I’m so fucking petty it’s disgusting and I hate myself to be honest.

imaginethebutts:

i am neither boy or girl i am punk rock

(Source: earthdad)

scarf/dress

batfromthedarkside:

Siouxsie And The Banshees - Bad Shape